Posts Tagged: content

New tools for parents and content for older kids in the YouTube Kids app

We believe that no two families are the same — and that their needs are ever-changing as they grow up. That’s why we are committed to building YouTube Kids in a way that offers kids the content they love and grown-ups the tools to customize the app as they see fit. Today we’re excited to launch two updates we think families will really enjoy: parent-approved content and a new experience for older kids.

First, we’re following up on our April announcement and sharing that we’ve launched parent-approved content. This highly requested parental control allows parents to handpick every video and channel available to their child in the app. It is available today globally on Android and coming soon to iOS.

For parents who want to enable this feature, open settings, go to the child’s profile and select “approved content only.” Now they’re ready to start picking videos for their kids.

Parents can choose any video, channel or collection of channels they like by tapping the “+” button. Parents can also search for a specific creator or video. If parents choose to enable this mode, their kids will not be able to search for content on their own.

What’s more, YouTube Kids is growing up with our users. We have launched a new experience geared toward 8-12 year olds that includes additional new content, like popular music and gaming videos. If parents think their kids are ready, they can pick this “Older” version when setting up a new profile or updating an existing profile. The “Younger” version is the default content experience and will continue to have a wide selection of sing-alongs and age-appropriate learning videos. Parents can change between “Younger,” “Older” and parent-approved content at any time. We’ve started to roll out the new older experience in the U.S. with plans to expand globally.

We work hard to make videos in the app family friendly, but no system is perfect. It’s always possible that a parent may find something they don’t want their child to watch in the “Younger” or “Older” experiences. If this happens, we ask that parents block and flag the video for review by our team. This makes YouTube Kids better for everyone.

As we continue to receive feedback from parents and turn that feedback into improvements to the YouTube Kids app, we hope that all families and kids can create the experience they want!

Happy watching from our family to yours,

James Beser, Product Director for YouTube Kids, recently viewed “Water Bottle Flip 2” from Dude Perfect


YouTube Blog

Netflix and Amazon will have to make more European content by law

Streaming services like Netflix and Amazon Prime Video will likely soon have to ensure at least 30 percent of their libraries are dedicated to local content in the European Union. A preliminary agreement on the rules is already in place, and Roberto…
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Twitch nixes Communities, adds tags to improve content discovery

Video game streaming service Twitch launched Communities in February of last year. These were ostensibly hub page for specific games or topics that members could create to help people find content. Now the company will shut these pages down mid-Septe…
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Sling TV reorganizes, will offer a new free tier and more on-demand content

The market of internet streaming TV is getting more and more competitive every day, but it’s pretty safe to say Sling TV kickstarted the entire concept. There’s a few more services to choose from today, whether we’re talking about PlayStation Vue, DirecTV Now, or any of the other smaller, more specific bundles, but Sling TV […]

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Instagram’s “Data Download” tool lets you save offline copies of your content

Instagram announced a couple of weeks ago that it would soon introduce a tool so users could download their information, similar to how Facebook users can. True to its word, Instagram has announced the availability of the tool that allows users to download their photos, videos, profile, info, comments, and archived Stories.  The “Data Download” […]

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Snap announces more layoffs amid content struggles

Snap has just laid off 22 employees, a sign that the company is continuing to struggle with slow user growth. The staff cuts affected teams across the company, but the content team was particularly hard hit. According to The Information, Snap's conte…
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YouTube may review its most popular channels for offensive content

It became pretty clear last year that YouTube has a content problem. Last spring, companies like AT&T and Verizon pulled ads because they were found to be appearing alongside extremist videos. And it was hit with another round of ad-pulling later…
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Tidal’s free 12-day trial comes with new content each day

Starting on Christmas, Tidal will begin a 12-day free trial period that's a little different than a typical trial. Tidal already has a 30-day free trial for its regular and HiFi tier, but this one doesn't require you to put in a credit card first or,…
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An update on our commitment to fight violent extremist content online

In June, we announced four steps we’re taking to combat terrorist content on YouTube:

  1. Better detection and faster removal powered by machine learning;
  2. More expert partners to help identify violative content;
  3. Tougher standards for videos that are controversial but do not violate our policies; and
  4. Amplified voices speaking out against hate and extremism.

We shared our progress across these steps in August and wanted to update you again on where things are today.

Better detection and faster removal

We’ve always used a mix of human flagging and human review together with technology to address controversial content on YouTube. In June, we introduced machine learning to flag violent extremism content and escalate it for human review. We continue to get faster here:

  • Over 83 percent of the videos we removed for violent extremism in the last month were taken down before receiving a single human flag, up 8 percentage points since August.
  • Our teams have manually reviewed over a million videos to improve this flagging technology by providing large volumes of training examples.

Inevitably, both humans and machines make mistakes, and as we have increased the volume of videos for review by our teams, we have made some errors. We know we can get better and we are committed to making sure our teams are taking action on the right content. We are working on ways to educate those who share video meant to document or expose violence on how to add necessary context.

More experts

Outside experts are essential to advising us on our policies and flagging content for additional inputs that better train our systems. Our partner NGOs bring expert knowledge of complex issues like hate speech, radicalization, and terrorism.

We have added 35 NGOs to our Trusted Flagger program, which is 70 percent of the way towards our goal. These new partner NGOs represent 20 different countries and include NGOs like the International Center for the Study of Radicalization at King’s College London and The Wahid Institute in Indonesia, which is dedicated to promoting religious freedom and tolerance.

Tougher standards

We started applying tougher treatment to videos that aren’t illegal and don’t violate our Guidelines, but contain controversial religious or supremacist content. These videos remain on YouTube, but they are behind a warning interstitial, aren’t recommended, monetized, and don’t have key features including comments, suggested videos, and likes. This is working as intended and helping us strike a balance between upholding free expression, by providing a historical record of content in the public interest, while also keeping these videos from being widely spread or recommended to others.

Amplify voices speaking out against hate and extremism

We continue to support programs that counter extremist messages. We are researching expansion for Jigsaw’s Redirect Method to apply this model to new languages and search terms. We’re heavily investing in our YouTube Creators for Change program to support Creators who are using YouTube to tackle social issues and promote awareness, tolerance and empathy. Every month these Creators release exciting and engaging new videos and campaigns to counter hate and social divisiveness:

  • In September, three of our fellows, from Australia, the U.K., and the U.S., debuted their videos on the big screen at the Tribeca TV festival, tackling topics like racism, xenophobia, and experiences of first generation immigrants.
  • Local YouTube Creators in Indonesia partnered with the MAARIF Institute and YouTube Creators for Change Ambassador, Cameo Project, to visit ten different cities and train thousands of high school students on promoting tolerance and speaking out against hate speech and extremism.
  • We’re adding two new local Creators for Change chapters, in Israel and Spain, to the network of chapters around the world.

In addition to this work supporting voices to counter hate and extremism, last month Google.org announced a $ 5 million innovation fund to counter hate and extremism. This funding will support technology-driven solutions, as well as grassroots efforts like community youth projects that help build communities and promote resistance to radicalization.

Terrorist and violent extremist material should not be spread online. We will continue to heavily invest to fight the spread of this content, provide updates to governments, and collaborate with other companies through the Global Internet Forum to Counter Terrorism. There remains more to do so we look forward to continuing to share our progress with you.

The YouTube Team


YouTube Blog

An update on our commitment to fight terror content online

A little over a month ago, we told you about the four new steps we’re taking to combat terrorist content on YouTube: better detection and faster removal driven by machine learning, more experts to alert us to content that needs review, tougher standards for videos that are controversial but do not violate our policies, and more work in the counter-terrorism space.

We wanted to give you an update on these commitments:

Better detection and faster removal driven by machine learning: We’ve always used a mix of technology and human review to address the ever-changing challenges around controversial content on YouTube. We recently began developing and implementing cutting-edge machine learning technology designed to help us identify and remove violent extremism and terrorism-related content in a scalable way. We have started rolling out these tools and we are already seeing some positive progress:

  • Speed and efficiency: Our machine learning systems are faster and more effective than ever before. Over 75 percent of the videos we’ve removed for violent extremism over the past month were taken down before receiving a single human flag.
  • Accuracy: The accuracy of our systems has improved dramatically due to our machine learning technology. While these tools aren’t perfect, and aren’t right for every setting, in many cases our systems have proven more accurate than humans at flagging videos that need to be removed.
  • Scale: With over 400 hours of content uploaded to YouTube every minute, finding and taking action on violent extremist content poses a significant challenge. But over the past month, our initial use of machine learning has more than doubled both the number of videos we’ve removed for violent extremism, as well as the rate at which we’ve taken this kind of content down.

We are encouraged by these improvements, and will continue to develop our technology in order to make even more progress. We are also hiring more people to help review and enforce our policies, and will continue to invest in technical resources to keep pace with these issues and address them responsibly.

More experts: Of course, our systems are only as good as the the data they’re based on. Over the past weeks, we have begun working with more than 15 additional expert NGOs and institutions through our Trusted Flagger program, including the Anti-Defamation League, the No Hate Speech Movement, and the Institute for Strategic Dialogue. These organizations bring expert knowledge of complex issues like hate speech, radicalization, and terrorism that will help us better identify content that is being used to radicalize and recruit extremists. We will also regularly consult these experts as we update our policies to reflect new trends. And we’ll continue to add more organizations to our network of advisors over time.

Tougher standards: We’ll soon be applying tougher treatment to videos that aren’t illegal but have been flagged by users as potential violations of our policies on hate speech and violent extremism. If we find that these videos don’t violate our policies but contain controversial religious or supremacist content, they will be placed in a limited state. The videos will remain on YouTube behind an interstitial, won’t be recommended, won’t be monetized, and won’t have key features including comments, suggested videos, and likes. We’ll begin to roll this new treatment out to videos on desktop versions of YouTube in the coming weeks, and will bring it to mobile experiences soon thereafter. These new approaches entail significant new internal tools and processes, and will take time to fully implement.

Early intervention and expanding counter-extremism work: We’ve started rolling out features from Jigsaw’s Redirect Method to YouTube. When people search for sensitive keywords on YouTube, they will be redirected towards a playlist of curated YouTube videos that directly confront and debunk violent extremist messages. We also continue to amplify YouTube voices speaking out against hate and radicalization through our YouTube Creators for Change program. Just last week, the U.K. chapter of Creators for Change, Internet Citizens, hosted a two-day workshop for 13-18 year-olds to help them find a positive sense of belonging online and learn skills on how to participate safely and responsibly on the internet. We also pledged to expand the program’s reach to 20,000 more teens across the U.K.

And over the weekend, we hosted our latest Creators for Change workshop in Bandung, Indonesia, where creators teamed up with Indonesia’s Maarif Institute to teach young people about the importance of diversity, pluralism, and tolerance.

Altogether, we have taken significant steps over the last month in our fight against online terrorism. But this is not the end. We know there is always more work to be done. With the help of new machine learning technology, deep partnerships, ongoing collaborations with other companies through the Global Internet Forum, and our vigilant community we are confident we can continue to make progress against this ever-changing threat. We look forward to sharing more with you in the months ahead.

The YouTube Team


YouTube Blog

Virtual reality content startup Jaunt lands on PlayStation VR

The PlayStation VR just got some additional content via the recently announced app launch by Jaunt. The platform will have instant access to 150 cinematic titles from the startup. The app includes videos like the award-winning animation Invasion, CBS…
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Top-trending Google Play content of 2016 includes Deadpool, Harry Potter

Google’s giving presents a little early this year — the company announced the best apps, books, movies, and shows of 2016 on Google Play. The winners represent global top-trending content and they span six categories,

The post Top-trending Google Play content of 2016 includes Deadpool, Harry Potter appeared first on Digital Trends.

Android Army–Digital Trends

Vrse rebrands to Within, aspires to be the HBO of virtual-reality content

Vrse, the company behind much prominent virtual reality content from partners like the New York Times, is rebranding to Within. The company’s goal is to become the HBO of virtual reality content.

The post Vrse rebrands to Within, aspires to be the HBO of virtual-reality content appeared first on Digital Trends.

Android Army–Digital Trends

Tweens rejoice! Amazon’s FreeTime Unlimited now has a slew of content for ages 9-12

Older kids can now enjoy Amazon’s FreeTime Unlimited just as much as their younger siblings. Amazon has updated the service to offer older kids, aged 9-12, over 13,000 videos, books, games, and more.

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BBC opens up iPlayer to outside content for the first time

Last September, the BBC put forward a number of proposals to make iPlayer and the rest of its broadcasting services more "open" and distinctive. One of these was a pledge to allow other people and broadcasters to distribute their programming through…
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Use your fingerprint to lock your content with Wiko’s uFeel

Wiko is a French startup that has been offering lower-budget phones for the past five years. It’s more recent announcement of smartphones have some distinguishing fun features enabled with a fingerprint sensor.

The post Use your fingerprint to lock your content with Wiko's uFeel appeared first on Digital Trends.

Android Army–Digital Trends

Sky’s Now TV app brings more UK content to Apple TV

While the new Apple TV has been available to order for over a week, UK-centric apps have been a bit thin on the ground. Less than a week after the BBC confirmed that iPlayer is coming to the streamer, Sky has gone one better and released an app for…
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ESPN is no longer displaying content on YouTube

youtube-logo_9339YouTube Red was announced this past week and may have left a few providers unsatisfied. ESPN being one of them.

Due to the creation of YouTube Red, ESPN will apparently no longer provide content on YouTube. This is reportedly due to rights and legal issues. However, Disney, the parent company of ESPN, just signed a deal that will include its content on YouTube Red. Which is kind of strange. Unfortunately those are all the details we have right now. Here’s the official statement made by ESPN regarding the service:

“ESPN is not currently part of the Red service. Content previously available on the free YouTube service will be available across ESPN digital properties”

Source: Mobile Reuters

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YouTube Kids app update helps parents tackle dodgy content

Google touts it as a “family friendly” app but since YouTube Kids’ launch in February a number of consumer groups have been complaining about inappropriate content on the service. Google says a new update aims to tackle ongoing concerns about the app.

The post YouTube Kids app update helps parents tackle dodgy content appeared first on Digital Trends.

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New original content from top YouTube creators

At YouTube, we have a core belief: we only succeed if our creators do.

After launching the Creator Hub to help creators get the most out of YouTube from anywhere in the world and opening YouTube Spaces in the U.S., the U.K., Japan and Brazil, we decided to take an even bolder step to invest in ambitious projects from our top creators. Today, we’re announcing partnerships with four top creators to help bring their next big original series to life on YouTube:

  • Since launching their first YouTube channel in 2007, the Fine Brothers’ channels have amassed over 17 million subscribers and over 3 billion views as well as earning a Daytime Emmy. They’ll continue the hot streak with their new scripted comedy series that takes a satirical look at the world of singing competition shows, produced in partnership with Mandeville Films.
  • For six years, Prank vs. Prank have waged an epic prank war on each other in front of an audience of nearly 14 million subscribers and generated nearly 3 billion views on their two channels. In their forthcoming series, celebrity guests join Jesse and Jeana to pull off their most ambitious pranks yet. 
  • Joey Graceffa has built a devoted fan following of over 5 million subscribers, cumed over 600 million views and earned two Teen Choice nominations through his channels’ daily vlogs, scripted series and short films. Now Joey will lead an all-star cast of YouTubers in his all-new murder mystery reality series.
  • For a decade, Smosh has entertained a YouTube fanbase of over 35 million subscribers across their channels with comedy sketches that have generated over 7 billion views. In their new comedy series, we’ll see Ian and Anthony working at a theme restaurant where out-of-control kids and crazy parents are all in a day’s work.

We’re also excited to announce a new collaboration between YouTube and AwesomenessTV. Together, we’ll release several feature length films over the next two years, all driven by YouTube stars and developed and produced by AwesomenessTV’s Brian Robbins. The films will all premiere globally on YouTube before they become available elsewhere, setting what we believe will become a new distribution paradigm for years to come. We hope to release our first film this fall, with more details to come soon.

We hope that these new series and feature films, as well as those that follow, give top creators a new way to showcase their talent to fans on YouTube.

Alex Carloss, Head of YouTube Originals recently watched “Me at the zoo.”


YouTube Blog