Posts Tagged: work

Expanding our work against abuse of our platform

As the CEO of YouTube, I’ve seen how our open platform has been a force for creativity, learning and access to information. I’ve seen how activists have used it to advocate for social change, mobilize protests, and document war crimes. I’ve seen how it serves as both an entertainment destination and a video library for the world. I’ve seen how it has expanded economic opportunity, allowing small businesses to market and sell their goods across borders. And I’ve seen how it has helped enlighten my children, giving them a bigger, broader understanding of our world and the billions who inhabit it.

But I’ve also seen up-close that there can be another, more troubling, side of YouTube’s openness. I’ve seen how some bad actors are exploiting our openness to mislead, manipulate, harass or even harm.

In the last year, we took actions to protect our community against violent or extremist content, testing new systems to combat emerging and evolving threats. We tightened our policies on what content can appear on our platform, or earn revenue for creators. We increased our enforcement teams. And we invested in powerful new machine learning technology to scale the efforts of our human moderators to take down videos and comments that violate our policies.

Now, we are applying the lessons we’ve learned from our work fighting violent extremism content over the last year in order to tackle other problematic content. Our goal is to stay one step ahead of bad actors, making it harder for policy-violating content to surface or remain on YouTube.

More people reviewing more content
Human reviewers remain essential to both removing content and training machine learning systems because human judgment is critical to making contextualized decisions on content. Since June, our trust and safety teams have manually reviewed nearly 2 million videos for violent extremist content, helping train our machine-learning technology to identify similar videos in the future. We are also taking aggressive action on comments, launching new comment moderation tools and in some cases shutting down comments altogether. In the last few weeks we’ve used machine learning to help human reviewers find and terminate hundreds of accounts and shut down hundreds of thousands of comments. Our teams also work closely with NCMEC, the IWF, and other child safety organizations around the world to report predatory behavior and accounts to the correct law enforcement agencies.

We will continue the significant growth of our teams into next year, with the goal of bringing the total number of people across Google working to address content that might violate our policies to over 10,000 in 2018.

At the same time, we are expanding the network of academics, industry groups and subject matter experts who we can learn from and support to help us better understand emerging issues.

Tackling issues at scale
We will use our cutting-edge machine learning more widely to allow us to quickly and efficiently remove content that violates our guidelines. In June we deployed this technology to flag violent extremist content for human review and we’ve seen tremendous progress.

  • Since June we have removed over 150,000 videos for violent extremism.
  • Machine learning is helping our human reviewers remove nearly five times as many videos than they were previously.
  • Today, 98 percent of the videos we remove for violent extremism are flagged by our machine-learning algorithms.
  • Our advances in machine learning let us now take down nearly 70 percent of violent extremist content within eight hours of upload and nearly half of it in two hours and we continue to accelerate that speed.
  • Since we started using machine learning to flag violent and extremist content in June, the technology has reviewed and flagged content that would have taken 180,000 people working 40 hours a week to assess.

Because we have seen these positive results, we have begun training machine-learning technology across other challenging content areas, including child safety and hate speech.

Greater transparency
We understand that people want a clearer view of how we’re tackling problematic content. Our Community Guidelines give users notice about what we do not allow on our platforms and we want to share more information about how these are enforced. That’s why in 2018 we will be creating a regular report where we will provide more aggregate data about the flags we receive and the actions we take to remove videos and comments that violate our content policies. We are looking into developing additional tools to help bring even more transparency around flagged content.

A new approach to advertising on YouTube
We’re also taking actions to protect advertisers and creators from inappropriate content. We want advertisers to have peace of mind that their ads are running alongside content that reflects their brand’s values. Equally, we want to give creators confidence that their revenue won’t be hurt by the actions of bad actors.

We believe this requires a new approach to advertising on YouTube, carefully considering which channels and videos are eligible for advertising. We are planning to apply stricter criteria, conduct more manual curation, while also significantly ramping up our team of ad reviewers to ensure ads are only running where they should. This will also help vetted creators see more stability around their revenue. It’s important we get this right for both advertisers and creators, and over the next few weeks, we’ll be speaking with both to hone this approach.

We are taking these actions because it’s the right thing to do. Creators make incredible content that builds global fan bases. Fans come to YouTube to watch, share, and engage with this content. Advertisers, who want to reach those people, fund this creator economy. Each of these groups is essential to YouTube’s creative ecosystem—none can thrive on YouTube without the other—and all three deserve our best efforts.

As challenges to our platform evolve and change, our enforcement methods must and will evolve to respond to them. But no matter what challenges emerge, our commitment to combat them will be sustained and unwavering. We will take the steps necessary to protect our community and ensure that YouTube continues to be a place where creators, advertisers, and viewers can thrive.

Susan Wojcicki, CEO of YouTube


YouTube Blog

Honeywell’s connected thermostats now work with Google Home

Google welcomed Honeywell into the Home family as a partner back in January, but now it's finally including both of the company's connected thermostat families, the Lyric and Total Connected Comfort.
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Work starts on a massive underground neutrino experiment

Neutrinos are notoriously difficult to understand, but work is underway to know them a little better. Researchers have officially broken ground on the Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility, the home to the international Deep Underground Neutrino Experimen…
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Android security came a long way in 2016 but Google says there is more work

Google made significant strides in shutting down malicious apps and distributing security updates last year, but has identified areas of improvement in a year-in-review blog post.

The post Android security came a long way in 2016 but Google says there is more work appeared first on Digital Trends.

Android Army–Digital Trends

Alexa can now work inside of your Plex library

Plex has a pretty big announcement that will bring your media library into the world of connected gadgets; you’ll now be able to control your Plex setup with Alexa through any of Amazon’s compatible products. Considering how flexible and powerful Plex is, this is a game changer for home media enthusiasts. This integration goes much […]

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‘Cool’ tech: Innovative air conditioners could work by beaming heat into deep space

In a recently published paper, researchers from Stanford University describe an impressive new refrigeration method for providing cooling: simply beam the heat into space.

The post ‘Cool’ tech: Innovative air conditioners could work by beaming heat into deep space appeared first on Digital Trends.

Cool Tech–Digital Trends

Google Apps for Work gets upgrades, rebranded to G Suite

As part of a move to enhance their offerings for enterprise clients, Google announced some improvements and enhancements to their Google Cloud platform and in particular to their set of tools previously known as Google Apps for Work. Those tools are basically a subset of all of Google’s applications that are available to run on […]

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Uber wants to fly you to work in a small autonomous aircraft

Uber says it’s interested in launching a city-based air service to give riders access to faster modes of transport. But instead of using a good ol’ fashioned helicopter, it wants to develop a much quieter machine that can fly autonomously.

The post Uber wants to fly you to work in a small autonomous aircraft appeared first on Digital Trends.

Cool Tech–Digital Trends

Microsoft puts AI to work in Office 365

Microsoft isn't just trying out artificial intelligence through bots and voice assistants — it's going all-in. The crew in Redmond has revealed that Office 365 is wielding cloud-based AI to automate many tasks. Tap for Word and Outlook surface rel…
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Facebook and Oculus exec leaving to work on wearable MRI

Facebook and Oculus head engineer Mary Lou Jepsen will be leaving for start-up Open Water to develop a wearable MRI. The aim is to reduce size and price to make MRIs more accessible to help people. Next step is work brain images paired with thoughts.

The post Facebook and Oculus exec leaving to work on wearable MRI appeared first on Digital Trends.

Wearables–Digital Trends

Microsoft is trying to make Chrome extensions work on Edge

Microsoft's very first batch of Edge browser extensions is small, but it seems the company's taking steps to make sure Windows users get more in the future. According to Microsoft Senior Program Manager Jacob Rossi, the tech titan is developing a "po…
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Google Maps lets you change your home and work icons

The latest Google Maps update lets you change your home and work images into various different icons, from a dragon or a castle, to a windmill or a crane. The update should be available on Android now.

The post Google Maps lets you change your home and work icons appeared first on Digital Trends.

Android Army–Digital Trends

Google might make a VR headset that doesn’t need a phone to work

google_cardboard_viewer_star_wars

We have been hearing talk that Google is working on a new VR headset. They already have the Google Cardboard, but this one is said to be much better.

One of the reasons this headset will be much better, and totally different from anything else out there, is the fact that it will be an all-in-one device. It won’t need a phone or a PC in order to work.

Google is actually said to be releasing two new VR headsets. One that is similar to a Samsung Gear VR, which uses a phone to be powered, and another one that doesn’t need anything else to work. The second one would be in its own class as everything else out there must have other devices to function properly.

We don’t know if these reports are true or not as we have heard that one headset is supposed to debut this year, however, we have also heard that Google might dump the idea entirely. If the rumours are true, a likely time frame to see the device would probably be at the Google I/O developer conference later this year. However, it would probably be the headset that works with phones first, and not the stand-alone one just yet.

Source: WSJ
Via: Engadget

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Amazon exec explains how Prime Air delivery drones will work

Amazon vice president Paul Misener doesn't know if the company already has a pricing scheme for its Prime Air service, but he knows everything else there is to know about the delivery drones. He talked about the project at length in an interview with…
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Volkswagen staff appear to be using Google Glass at work

It seems as if Volkswagen logistics staff are using Google Glass for work. It certainly looks that way, with the car company issuing what it describes as “3D smart glasses” to a number of employees following a successful three-month trial.

The post Volkswagen staff appear to be using Google Glass at work appeared first on Digital Trends.

Wearables»Digital Trends

Apple sets ResearchKit to work on cures for autism, epilepsy, and melanoma

Apple has announced three new studies for ResearchKit, focused on autism, epilepsy, and melanoma. The studies use the iPhone, iPad, and Apple Watch to spot early signs, and gain more info for medical research.

The post Apple sets ResearchKit to work on cures for autism, epilepsy, and melanoma appeared first on Digital Trends.

Wearables»Digital Trends

Android Wear smartwatches now work on iOS

Android Wear smartwatches will now work with iPhones, Google announced in a surprise blog post. All future Android Wear smartwatches will work with iPhones, and some older models will support Apple’s OS, too.

The post Android Wear smartwatches now work on iOS appeared first on Digital Trends.

Mobile»Digital Trends

Google Maps and YouTube will work offline for people in developing countries

Google has announced it’s working hard on an offline feature for Google Maps, but rather than a simplified version, it will contain many of the major features, including turn-by-turn navigation — all without a data connection.

The post Google Maps and YouTube will work offline for people in developing countries appeared first on Digital Trends.

Wearables | Digital Trends