Posts By Michelle Turner

How to buy Bitcoin

In this guide, we teach you how to buy Bitcoin for the first time, from finding the right wallets and exchanges to spending Bitcoin in a smart, efficient way.
Emerging Tech | Digital Trends

Niantic’s ‘Pikmin Bloom’ mobile game starts rolling out

Pokémon Go's creator has a new augmented reality mobile game, and this time, it's all about Pikmin. Niantic is now rolling out Pikmin Bloom worldwide, starting with Singapore and Australia where it's already live. Similar to Pokémon Go, you'll have to go out and interact with the real world enjoy the game. It's really more of a fun and colorful companion for daily walks or hikes, though, since it doesn't have battles and doesn't have the incentive of catching rare monsters like Pokémon Go does. 

In Pikmin Bloom, you'll find seedlings when you walk that you can pick up and grow into plant-like creatures that'll follow you around. The more you walk, the more Pikmin you can pluck and the more Pikmin will follow you around. Onscreen, you're depicted as a Mii avatar, with a bunch of creatures walking behind you and making more flowers bloom along your path. You'll also be able to collect items on your walks, including clothes Pikmin can wear and fruit you can feed your creatures to make flowers bloom on their heads.

Niantic CEO John Hanke said in the game's video announcement that the flowers the Pikmin make can be viewed by other players, so you can create shared gardens with your neighbors. Pikmin Bloom is now live for Android and iOS in Singapore and Australia, and it will be arriving in more countries and regions "shortly."

Engadget is a web magazine with obsessive daily coverage of everything new in gadgets and consumer electronics

The 2022 Range Rover will come with both ‘mild’ and plug-in hybrid powertrains

Land Rover executives unveiled the latest iteration of the company's renowned flagship on Tuesday, showing off a strikingly well-appointed 5th generation SUV that's also surprisingly friendly to the environment, if not your budget.

The company's emphasis on modernism is on full display with the 2023 Range Rover's exterior. A gently sloping roofline contrasted against a rising sill line as well as other classic design details are joined by state-of-the-art amenities like retractable exterior door handles to help improve the vehicle's aerodynamic performance by nearly 12 percent compared to its previous iterations. The entire vehicle is built on Land Rover's new MLA-Flex architecture allowing for 11.6 inches of ground clearance and fording through more than 35 inches of water. 

2023 Range Rover
Land Rover

An electronic air suspension, which debuted on the Range Rover back in 1992, will keep random road divots from detracting from the drive while the new Dynamic Response Pro system will electronically negate body roll during high speed cornering. Coolest of all, the 2023 Range Rover will offer 4-wheel steering, enabling the rear wheels to turn up to 7 degrees to help maintain stability while cornering as well as reducing the Range Rover's low-speed turning radius to rival that of a Honda Civic.

In terms of powertrains, the new Range Rover offers a slew of options. The base models will come with a 48V mild-hybrid 3.0L Turbocharged I6 — turning out 395 hp and 406 ft-lbs of torque — standard. Above that, a 523 hp (553 ft-lbs of torque) 4.4L Twin Turbo V8 is available as well. By the time the Range Rover hits US shores in 2023, Land Rover expects to offer it with an optional 434 hp plug-in hybrid engine capable of travelling up to 62 miles on electric power alone using its 38.2 kWh battery. And, come 2024, Land Rover has announced plans to offer its flagship with an all-electric drivetrain. 

But the luxury shown off during Tuesday's livestream comes at a price. A very steep price. The entry level P400 SE starts at $ 104,000 ($ 110,000 if you opt for the 7 seater variant) and climes to a whopping $ 163,500 for the P530 First Edition with the long wheelbase. Preorders for the new Range Rover are already open and deliveries are expected to begin next spring.

Engadget is a web magazine with obsessive daily coverage of everything new in gadgets and consumer electronics

Third-gen Oura Ring gets more temperature sensors, updated heart rate monitor

The third-generation Oura Ring smart ring has a new sensor array and a variety of new software features coming at launch and into next year.
Wearables | Digital Trends

Leaked images reveal Sony’s PRO-1 has a massive 1-inch camera sensor

Sony is holding a launch event tomorrow but as you might have already guessed from the headline, images of its successor to the Xperia Pro from 2020 have already been leaked. These images point to the Xperia Pro-1 featuring a massive 1-inch camera sensor as one of its trio of rear cameras. Thanks to the […]

Come comment on this article: Leaked images reveal Sony’s PRO-1 has a massive 1-inch camera sensor


TalkAndroid

A new affordable Motorola smartwatch could be coming by the end of the year

New Motorola-branded smartwatches are on the way for the end of the year with mass production beginning in November.
Wearables | Digital Trends

Apple’s iOS 15.1 and iPadOS 15.1 bring SharePlay, camera improvements, and more

Apple is rolling out iOS 15.1 and iPadOS 15.1 with SharePlay, ProRes video for iPhone 13 Pro and Pro Max, other camera improvements, and more.
Mobile | Digital Trends

HomePod mini software update adds support for Apple Music lossless

It's not only iOS and macOS that Apple has updated today. The company has rolled out a firmware update for HomePod as well. The discontinued speaker now supports Apple Music lossless playback, as well as Dolby Atmos spatial audio. Apple Music lossless will also be available on HomePod mini after you update it via the HomePod section of the Home app.

It's a much-needed update, since Apple Music lossless hit iOS, iPadOS, macOS and Apple TV 4K devices in June. Apple only started publicly testing lossless and Dolby Atmos support on HomePod in August. In any case, it's good to see that Apple eventually brought a pair of notable audio features to products it designed primarily to, you know, play audio.


Engadget is a web magazine with obsessive daily coverage of everything new in gadgets and consumer electronics

This titanium, connected G-Shock is a $1,650 sci-fi-inspired design masterpiece

G-Shock has totally embraced the world of science fiction for the design of its new GMW-B5000TVA connected watch, but it has done so in a really neat way.
Wearables | Digital Trends

How to set up Google Voice on your smartphone or computer

Google Voice lets you call anyone via the internet while maintaining your privacy. Use this handy guide to set up Google Voice on a phone or computer.
Android | Digital Trends

The best FPV drone videos of all time

Check out the some of the best FPV drone videos you’re ever likely to see, created by incredible pilots at the top of their game.
Emerging Tech | Digital Trends

Astronomers directly observe one of the youngest planets to date

Astronomers have spotted young planets before, but rarely this young — or with such easy observation. As CBS Newssays, a University of Hawaii-led team has discovered 2M0437b, one of the youngest planets ever found at 'just' several million years old. The baby planet was found in the Taurus Cloud "nursery" and young enough that it's still emanating lava-like heat from its birth.

Importantly, this is also a very rare chance at directly observing an infant world. Researchers will still need to use special optics to compensate for Earth's atmosphere, but they won't have to use the host star or other tricks to study the planet. It helps that 2M0437b is about one hundred times further from its star than Earth is from the Sun, reducing the chances for interference.

The scientists first spotted the planet in 2018 using the Subaru Telescope, but spent the next three years using the Keck Observatory and other Hawaii telescopes to track the planet and confirm it was tied to its host.

Future observations could shed more light on planetary formation. It might not take much longer to glean more details, either. The team hoped the imminent James Webb Space Telescope could help detect atmospheric gases and newly forming moons. As significant as 2M0437b might be now, it could be more important going forward.

Engadget is a web magazine with obsessive daily coverage of everything new in gadgets and consumer electronics

Google drops developer fees in the Play Store to as low as 10%

Google is making Play Store pricing more appealing to developers by slashing content fees to as low as 10% and subscription fees to 15%.
Android | Digital Trends

Leaked Samsung Galaxy Tab S8 renders show sleek design similar to the S7

Samsung’s Galaxy Tab S8 might be skipping 2021, but new renders show us a sleek build similar to the S7.
Android | Digital Trends

You won’t believe how cheap this Apple Watch is today

The 40mm, GPS version of the Apple Watch Series 6 is discounted by $ 70 in an early Black Friday deal from Amazon, which lowers the smartwatch’s price to $ 329.
Wearables | Digital Trends

When is my phone getting Android 12?

Google has released Android 12 to Pixels, and you might be wondering when you’ll get it on your phone. Here’s everything you need to know.
Android | Digital Trends

Samsung’s giant Galaxy Tab S8 Ultra might include a notch

Rumors have persisted of a flagship Samsung tablet even larger than the Galaxy Tab S7+, and now you might know what it looks like. OnLeaks and 91Mobiles have shared what they claim are images of the Galaxy Tab S8 Ultra. The slate would minimize the impact of its huge 14.6-inch display by stuffing the front camera system into a notch — potentially distracting, but better than a conventional design that might be even larger.

The design wouldn't be quite so unusual on the other side. The leak suggests the Galaxy Tab S8 Ultra would have dual rear cameras and the familiar magnetic strip to hold your S Pen. The source claimed the imagery was "not 100 percent complete," so there's a chance the design could change slightly no matter how accurate it is as of this writing.

The regular Tab S8 and S8+ models aren't expected to use the notch. They might instead be subtle evolutions of the existing designs, which tuck the front camera into the bezel.

It's not clear just when the Galaxy Tab S8 Ultra would arrive. 91Mobiles speculates that Samsung might launch the design in November or December, but it would be odd to wait until the very end of the year to release an important tablet, even if chip shortages weren't a factor. It might be easier for Samsung to wait until early 2022, when it can launch the Tab S8 series alongside the Galaxy S22.

Engadget is a web magazine with obsessive daily coverage of everything new in gadgets and consumer electronics

The best smartwatches for 2021

Smartwatches offer notifications, fitness tracking, and more. Choosing one is the hard part, so to help, here is our list of the best smartwatches you can buy.
Wearables | Digital Trends

Apple Watch Series 7 Review: The best smartwatch you can buy, by far

Spoiler alert: The Apple Watch Series 7 impresses at every turn, and does everything you could want and more.
Wearables | Digital Trends

We have the tech to curb drunk driving, but invisible forces are holding it back

Statistically, one person dies from drunk driving every 52 minutes in the U.S. — but it doesn’t have to be that way. We have the technology to stop it.
Emerging Tech | Digital Trends

Apple Watch Series 7 teardown reveals new display tech and a slightly bigger battery

The Apple Watch Series 7 teardown by iFixit revealed some changes under the hood, including new display tech and bigger battery.
Mobile | Digital Trends

Apple’s $19 Polishing Cloth appears to have sold out

The new polishing cloth that Apple quietly added to its online store after its Unleashed event earlier this week appears to have sold out.
Wearables | Digital Trends

The Huawei Watch GT 3 has a shamrock to fill, not rings to close

Huawei has updated its fitness software and sensors for the new Watch GT 3, shunning activity rings and adopting a shamrock shape as its motivational tool.
Wearables | Digital Trends

Google and Roku’s ongoing feud could result in the removal of the YouTube app from December 9th

It’s a few months since Google and Roku’s spat about YouTube TV became public, and now it seems that access to another of the search giant’s apps is also on the line. This time it’s the turn of the YouTube app which could be removed from Roku on December 9th thanks to it and Google […]

Come comment on this article: Google and Roku’s ongoing feud could result in the removal of the YouTube app from December 9th


TalkAndroid

Google starts licensing Stadia tech to other companies

When Google shut down its internal Stadia game development studios earlier this year, Stadia general manager Phil Harrison said the company planned to "work with partners seeking a gaming solution all built on Stadia’s advanced technical infrastructure and platform tools." We're starting to see that strategy in action, as Google is now licensing Stadia tech to other companies.

As first reported by 9to5 Google and confirmed by IGN, AT&T is using the tech to offer wireless subscribers the chance to stream Batman: Arkham Knight (which isn't available on Stadia proper) for free. Customers can play the game for a limited time at up to 1080p through Google Chrome or Microsoft Edge.

"This is being powered by the Stadia technology," an AT&T spokesperson told IGN. "For this demo AT&T created a front end experience to enable gamers to play Batman: Arkham Knight directly from their own website and the game is playable on virtually any computer or laptop."

Oddly enough, subscribers can't take advantage of this offer on a smartphone, despite it seeming like a solid opportunity for AT&T to show off its network capabilities. AT&T even offered six months of Stadia Pro access to 5G and fiber internet customers this year.

Harrison said in February that offering game streaming tech to other companies (without Stadia branding in this case) was "the best path to building Stadia into a long-term, sustainable business that helps grow the industry." Although Google isn't making its own games for Stadia anymore, it has continued to add third-party games to the store.

Engadget is a web magazine with obsessive daily coverage of everything new in gadgets and consumer electronics

NFTs have a climate problem, and the solution isn’t coming fast enough

NFTs have an absolutely massive carbon footprint, and while there are many solutions in the works, very few of them are expected to roll out anytime soon.
Emerging Tech | Digital Trends

Apple’s $19 Polishing Cloth appears to have sold out

The new polishing cloth that Apple quietly added to its online store after its Unleashed event earlier this week appears to have sold out.
Mobile | Digital Trends

Google’s 3-year update promise for the Pixel 6 is disappointing but predictable

The Pixel 6 might be coming with a new Tensor chip, but Google isn’t extending the software upgrade timeline past the current three-year mark.
Android | Digital Trends

Commerce Department limits sale of hacking tools to Russia and China

The US Commerce Department has announced new rules related to the export and resale of cyber intrusion software. Once the limits come into effect in 90 days, companies that want to sell their hacking tools to countries “of national security or weapons of mass destruction concern” will need to obtain a license from the department’s Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS). The policy also covers nations that are under a US arms embargo.

Per The Washington Post, the rule is complicated. There are already many limitations on the export of intrusion software. Similarly, there are opportunities for companies to obtain exceptions. The main point is that the policy would cover the sale of software to countries like China and Russia. It would also limit the sale of programs like NSO’s Pegasus spyware, which some governments have used to target dissidents and journalists.

“The United States Government opposes the misuse of technology to abuse human rights or conduct other malicious cyber activities, and these new rules will help ensure that US companies are not fueling authoritarian practices,” the Commerce Department said.

Among the 42 countries involved in the Wassenaar Arrangement, a pact that sets voluntary export controls on military and dual-use technologies, the US is one of the last to impose limits on the sale of hacking software. Part of the reason for that is that the country has spent years working on the rules to ensure they don’t prevent cybersecurity researchers across the globe from working together to discover new flaws.

Engadget is a web magazine with obsessive daily coverage of everything new in gadgets and consumer electronics

The best Bluetooth trackers for 2021

Always losing your keys? You’ll probably want to invest in a Bluetooth tracker. We’ve picked some of the best on the market to help you keep track of things.
Emerging Tech | Digital Trends

Samsung Galaxy Watch 4 down to lowest-ever price at Best Buy — but hurry!

The GPS, 42mm version of the Samsung Galaxy Watch 4 Classic is down to $ 300 on Best Buy, after a $ 50 discount under the retailer’s early Black Friday deals.
Wearables | Digital Trends

We’re going to the red planet! All the past, present, and future missions to Mars

A detailed list of all operational and planned missions to Mars, along with explanations of their objectives.
Emerging Tech | Digital Trends

Sony’s first drone, the Airpeak S1, rockets to 55 mph in just 3.5 seconds

Sony’s first drone accelerates to 55mph in a blink-and-you-will-miss-it 3.5s, making it the fastest accelerating drone in the industry. Shame it costs $ 9,000.
Emerging Tech | Digital Trends

Raspberry Pi’s Build HAT helps students build LEGO robots

Raspberry Pi has launched a new product that would make it easier to build robots out of LEGO components. The Build HAT (or Hardware Attached on Top), as it is called, is an add-on device that plugs into the Pi's 40-pin GPIO header. It was specifically designed to make it easy to use Pi hardware to control up to four LEGO Technic motors and sensors from the the toy company's Education Spike kits. Those sets are meant as a STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, the Arts and Mathematics) learning tool for young students. The HAT also works with motors and sensors from the Mindstorms Robot Inventor kit.

In addition to the Build HAT itself, the company has created a Python library that can help students build prototypes using a Raspberry Pi and LEGO components. Plus, Raspberry Pi designed a $ 15 power supply for the HAT that can also power the motors and sensors attached to it. The Build HAT will set buyers back $ 25 each, and it works with all 40-pin GPIO Raspberry Pi boards, including the Raspberry Pi 4 and Raspberry Pi Zero. 

Those who want to make sure that their LEGO components will work with the HAT can also check out Raspberry Pi's handy list of compatible components. Finally, those who need a bit of help to get started can try follow one of Pi's project guides, which include a DIY game controller, a robot buggy that can be controlled via Bluetooth and a robotic face.

Engadget is a web magazine with obsessive daily coverage of everything new in gadgets and consumer electronics

Apple’s new Polishing Cloth comes with a hefty price tag

Apple released some new kit on Monday that includes upgraded MacBook Pro laptops and AirPods earbuds. It also released a pricey polishing cloth.
Wearables | Digital Trends

The Moto 360 and other older Wear OS watches can now download YouTube Music

Google is bringing YouTube Music to older Wear OS watches after rolling it out to the Snapdragon Wear 4100 watches last month.
Wearables | Digital Trends

Scientists think the next big solar storm could create an ‘internet apocalypse’

Scientists say that our existing internet infrastructure — namely undersea cables — isn’t equipped to weather the next big solar storm. Here’s why.
Emerging Tech | Digital Trends

Target and Amazon confirm surprisingly cheap Pixel 6 price

A last burst of leaks before the Pixel 6 launch date reveals a surprisingly cheap entry as Google focuses on aggressive pricing.
Android | Digital Trends

The best cheap Samsung Galaxy S20 deals for October 2021

If you’re after Samsung Galaxy S20 deals, Galaxy S20+ deals, or Galaxy S20 Ultra deals, we’ve got them here.
Android | Digital Trends

Are smartwatches and fitness trackers making us more anxious?

Modern smartwatches and fitness trackers can capture more health data than ever before, but in some cases, that data might be doing more harm than good.
Mobile | Digital Trends

UK schools will use facial recognition to speed up lunch payments

Facial recognition may soon play a role in your child's lunch. The Financial Timesreports that nine schools in the UK's North Ayrshire will start taking payments for canteen (aka cafeteria) lunches by scanning students' faces. The technology should help minimize touch during the pandemic, but is mainly meant to speed up transaction times. That could be important when you may have roughly 25 minutes to serve an entire school of hungry kids.

Both the schools and system installer CRB Cunningham argued the systems would address privacy and security concerns. CRB Cunningham noted its hardware wasn't using live facial recognition (actively scanning crowds), and was checking against encrypted faceprint templates. Schools were already using fingerprint readers, too, so this was more of a shift in biometric technology than a brand new layer of security. There were also concerns about fraud using conventional PINs — facial recognition is theoretically safer. North Ayrshire's council added that 97 percent of children or parents had offered consent.

That won't satisfy some critics, though. Big Brother Watch and England's Biometrics Commissioner both maintained that facial recognition was arbitrary. There was a concern that school rollouts might normalize face scanning and numb students to privacy concerns. If you grow up with this technology, you might not object when it crops up at airports or music festivals.

You might not see this spread to the US and other countries given mounting opposition. However, it's safe to say many will be watching the UK school rollout to gauge both the viability of facial recognition and its real-world pitfalls.

Engadget is a web magazine with obsessive daily coverage of everything new in gadgets and consumer electronics

Best Prime Day Drone deals 2021: What to expect

Prime Day is nearing and we’re checking out what to expect from the Prime Day drone sales that should happen soon.
Emerging Tech | Digital Trends

The best USB-C cables for 2021

Many new smartphones require USB cables, as do various accessories. Our roundup of the best and most versatile cables on the market will make your choice easy.
Android | Digital Trends

The best iPhone to buy in 2021

Shopping for a new iPhone? We compare all of the current models available to determine the best options for every need and budget.
Mobile | Digital Trends

The future of mobility: 5 transportation technologies to watch out for

From autonomous vehicles to flying taxis, the future of mobility and transportation is set to change dramatically in the next few decades. Here’s a preview
Emerging Tech | Digital Trends

Hitting the Books: How Amazon’s aggressive R&D push made it an e-commerce behemoth

Amazon is the Standard Oil of the 21st century. Its business operations and global reach dwarf those of virtually every other company on the planet — and exceed the GDP of more than a few countries — illustrating the vital importance innovation has on the modern economy. In his latest book, The Exponential Age: How Accelerating Technology is Transforming Business, Politics and Society, author Azeem Azhar examines how the ever-increasing pace of technological progress is impacting, influencing — and often rebuilding — our social, political and economic mores from the ground up.

The Exponential Age by Azeem Azhar
Diversion Books

Excerpted from The Exponential Age: How Accelerating Technology is Transforming Business, Politics and Society by Azeem Azhar. Copyright © 2021 Azeem Azhar. Printed with permission of the publisher, Diversion Books. All rights reserved.


In 2020, Amazon turned twenty-six years old. Over the previous quarter of a century, the company had transformed shopping. With retail revenues in excess of $ 213 billion, it was larger than Germany’s Schwarz Gruppe, America’s Costco, and every British retailer. Only America’s Walmart, with more than half a trillion dollars of sales, was bigger. But Amazon was, by this time, far and away the world’s largest online retailer. Its online business was about eight times larger than Walmart’s. Amazon was more than just an online shop, however. Its huge operations in areas such as cloud computing, logistics, media, and hardware added a further $ 172 billion in sales.

At the heart of Amazon’s success is an annual research and development budget that reached a staggering $ 36 billion in 2019, and which is used to develop everything from robots to smart home assistants. This sum leaves other companies — and many governments — behind. It is not far off the UK government’s annual budget for research and development. The entire US government’s federal R&D budget for 2018 was only $ 134 billion. 

Amazon spent more on R&D in 2018 than the US National Institutes of Health. Roche, the global pharmaceutical company renowned for its investment in research, spent a mere $ 12 billion in R&D in 2018. Meanwhile Tesco, the largest retailer in Britain — with annual sales in excess of £50 billion (approximately $ 70 billion) — had a research lab whose budget was in the “six figures” in 2016.

Perhaps more remarkable is the rate at which Amazon grew this budget. Ten years earlier, Amazon’s research budget was $ 1.2 billion. Over the course of the next decade, the firm increased its annual R&D budget by about 44 percent every year. As the 2010s went on, Amazon doubled down on its investments in research. In the words of Werner Vogels, the firm’s chief technology officer, if they stopped innovating they “would be out of business in ten to fifteen years.”

In the process, Amazon created a chasm between the old world and the new. The approach of traditional business was to rely on models that succeeded yesterday. They were based on a strategy that tomorrow might be a little different, but not markedly so.

This kind of linear thinking, rooted in the assumption that change takes decades and not months, may have worked in the past—but not anymore. Amazon understood the nature of the Exponential Age. The pace of change was accelerating; the companies that could harness the technologies of the new era would take off. And those that couldn’t keep up would be undone at remarkable speed.

This divergence between the old and the new is one example of what I call the “exponential gap.” On the one hand, there are technologies that develop at an exponential pace—and the companies, institutions, and communities that adapt to or harness those developments. On the other, there are the ideas and norms of the old world. The companies, institutions, and communities that can only adapt at an incremental pace. These get left behind—and fast.

The emergence of this gap is a consequence of exponential technology. Until the early 2010s, most companies assumed the cost of their inputs would remain pretty similar from year to year, perhaps with a nudge for inflation. The raw materials might fluctuate based on commodity markets, but their planning processes, institutionalized in management orthodoxy, could manage such volatility. But in the Exponential Age, one primary input for a company is its ability to process information. One of the main costs to process that data is computation. And the cost of computation didn’t rise each year; it declined rapidly. The underlying dynamics of how companies operate had shifted.

In Chapter 1, we explored how Moore’s Law amounts to a halving of the underlying cost of computation every couple of years. It means that every ten years, the cost of the processing that can be done by a computer will decline by a factor of one hundred. But the implications of this process stretch far beyond our personal laptop use—and far beyond the interests of any one laptop manufacturer.

In general, if an organization needs to do something that uses computation, and that task is too expensive today, it probably won’t be too expensive in a couple of years. For companies, this realization has deep significance. Firms that figured out that the effective price of computation was declining, even if the notional price of what they were buying was staying the same (or even rising), could plan, practice, and experiment with the near future in mind. Even if those futuristic activities were expensive now, they would become affordable soon enough. Organizations that understood this deflation, and planned for it, became well-positioned to take advantage of the Exponential Age.

If Amazon’s early recognition of this trend helped transform it into one of the most valuable companies in history, they were not alone. Many of the new digital giants—from Uber to Alibaba, Spotify to TikTok—took a similar path. And following in their footsteps were firms who understand how these processes apply in other sectors. The bosses at Tesla understood that the prices of electric vehicles might decline on an exponential curve, and launched the electric vehicle revolution. The founders of Impossible Foods understood how the expensive process of precision fermentation (which involves genetically modified microorganisms) would get cheaper and cheaper. Executives at space companies like Spire and Planet Labs understood this process would drive down the cost of putting satellites in orbit. Companies that didn’t adapt to exponential technology shifts, like much of the newspaper publishing industry, didn’t stand a chance.

We can visualize the gap by returning to our now-familiar exponential curve. As we’ve seen, individual technologies develop according to an S-curve, which begins by roughly following an exponential trajectory. And as we’ve seen, it starts off looking a bit humdrum. In those early days, exponential change is distinctly boring, and most people and organizations ignore it. At this point in the curve, the industry producing an exponential technology looks exciting to those in it, but like a backwater to everyone else. But at some point, the line of exponential change crosses that of linear change. Soon it reaches an inflection point. That shift in gear, which is both sudden and subtle, is hard to fathom. 

Because, for all the visibility of exponential change, most of the institutions that make up our society follow a linear trajectory. Codified laws and unspoken social norms; legacy companies and NGOs; political systems and intergovernmental bodies—all have only ever known how to adapt incrementally. Stability is an important force within institutions. In fact, it’s built into them.

The gap between our institutions’ capacity to change and our new technologies’ accelerating speed is the defining consequence of our shift into the Exponential Age. On the one side, you have the new behaviors, relationships, and structures that are enabled by exponentially improving technologies, and the products and services built from them. On the other, you have the norms that have evolved or been designed to suit the needs of earlier configurations of technology. The gap leads to extreme tension. In the Exponential Age, this divergence is ongoing—and it is everywhere.

Engadget is a web magazine with obsessive daily coverage of everything new in gadgets and consumer electronics

Nothing could launch something mobile in 2022

Fresh from nabbing a $ 50 million investment from Qualcomm, Nothing’s Carl Pei has confirmed on Twitter that the brand will be launching ‘Something’. While Pei was coy about revealing any further info, it’s being reported that Nothing is preparing to launch a smartphone during 2022, as well as a power bank. According to 91Mobiles, Nothing […]

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TalkAndroid

Should you buy the Google Pixel 6 or get an older model instead?

The Pixel 6 and its sibling, the Pixel 6 Pro, should be the most advanced Google phones yet, but they cost more. Should you save and go with an older Pixel?
Android | Digital Trends

WhatsApp’s online backups are getting end-to-end encryption

WhatsApp’s backups are now end-to-end encrypted in the cloud as Facebook rolls out a new update.
Android | Digital Trends

5 things the Amazfit GTR 3 Pro can do that the Apple Watch Series 7 can’t

Both the Apple Watch Series 7 and the Amazfit GTR 3 Pro have their own advantages and disadvantages, but here are five where Amazfit pulls ahead.
Wearables | Digital Trends